LOS ANGELES (AP) Tommy Hawkins, the first black basketball player to earn All-America honors at Notre Dame and who played for the Los Angeles Lakers during a 10-year NBA career, died Wednesday. He was 80.
Hawkins died in his sleep at home in Malibu, son Kevin told The Associated Press. He had been in good health and had lay down to rest, his oldest son said.
Hawkins graduated from Notre Dame in 1959 after playing three years on the basketball team. He had 1,318 career rebounds for the longest-standing record in Fighting Irish history. He was named to the school's All-Century team in 2004 and inducted into its Ring of Honor in 2015. He led the Irish to a 44-13 record over his last two seasons, including an Elite Eight berth in the 1958 NCAA Tournament.
''He loved Notre Dame with every fiber of his being,'' said Kevin Hawkins, who followed in his father's footsteps and played basketball for the Irish before graduating in 1981. ''He said Notre Dame did so much for him and grew him up to become the man that he would become.''
Hawkins became close with Notre Dame president Theodore Hesburgh, who served from 1952-87. Hesburgh was supportive when Hawkins was dating a white woman from nearby Saint Mary's College and they were turned away from a South Bend restaurant that wouldn't allow the interracial couple to dine, Kevin Hawkins said.
''That act led Father Hesburgh to ban Notre Dame (students) from eating there until my father got a public apology,'' Kevin Hawkins said by phone from his home in South Bend. ''Notre Dame walked the talk when you talk about civil rights. That meant the world to him.''
Kevin Hawkins said his father's basketball teammate and future NFL Hall of Famer Paul Hornung led Hawkins back to the restaurant to secure the apology.
Kevin Hawkins said he spoke to his father almost daily and they had recently discussed last weekend's civil unrest in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Hawkins was selected by the Minneapolis Lakers with the third pick in the first round of the 1959 NBA draft. He played one season in Minnesota before moving with the team to Los Angeles. He went on to play six seasons for the Lakers, averaging 9.0 points and 5.7 rebounds in 454 games.
The 6-foot-5 forward also played for the Cincinnati Royals from 1962-66. Hawkins recorded 6,672 points and 4,607 rebounds in his pro career.
''He was and will always be part of the Lakers family,'' team CEO and majority owner Jeanie Buss said. ''His baritone voice and easy demeanor made him a favorite of the fans and media, as well as everyone who had the honor of calling him a friend.''
Hawkins' influence continued beyond his playing days. As a player representative, he had a key role in establishing the first collective bargaining agreement with the players' union and the NBA.
Born Thomas Jerome Hawkins on Dec. 22, 1936, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, he moved to Chicago with his mother and aunt as a child. He starred at the city's Parker High, now Robeson High, before being recruited by Notre Dame.
Kevin Hawkins recalled his father as a man with interests that ranged from poetry to jazz to sports. He self-published a book of poetry and Hawkins was in the midst of writing a memoir on his basketball career when he died.
''My father was a person who didn't want to be defined as a jock or an ex-player,'' Kevin Hawkins said. ''He was an eclectic man. He had stories about everything from Notre Dame to the NBA to broadcasting.''
Hawkins enjoyed friendships with Alabama football coach Bear Bryant; UCLA basketball coach John Wooden; Southern California football coach John McKay; and artist LeRoy Neiman.
''You think about a man who grew up in the projects of Chicago that had done all these things in his life,'' Kevin Hawkins said. ''He called himself a cosmic functionary. That was his big deal. It made us all cringe, but he just loved it. He was a man of the world and a man of the people.''
Hawkins' gregarious personality was on full display as master of ceremonies for the John R. Wooden Award presentation for over 30 years before he passed on his MC duties in 2011. He was co-national chairman of the award that honors the nation's top male and female college basketball players.
Hawkins was hired in 1987 by then-Dodgers owner Peter O'Malley to be vice president of communications and he worked for the team until 2004.
''In life we are fortunate to know many people and Tommy was one person I always looked forward to seeing and being with,'' said O'Malley, who sold the team in 1998. ''He did an extraordinary job for the Dodgers as vice president, and his friendship will be missed by his family and many admirers.''
The Dodgers had a moment of silence for Hawkins before their game against the White Sox on Wednesday night.
Before joining the Dodgers, Hawkins worked in radio and television in Southern California, including stints with KNBC-TV and KABC radio.
He is survived by his second wife, Layla, and their daughter Neda; his first wife, Dori, and their children Kevin, Karel, Traci and David; seven grandchildren; and a great grandchild.
The family will likely hold a public memorial at a future date, Kevin Hawkins said.

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