COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - An Associated Press review of infractions cases since 2000 found that show-cause orders tend to have a sharply uneven impact.
Of the 44 former men's basketball coaches given the sanctions since 2000, at least 25 found other basketball jobs. Some remained involved with big-time programs, while others labored in obscurity at junior colleges, high schools or AAU programs. A few have found second acts in the NBA or as TV analysts.
The AP found that head coaches hit with show-cause orders tend to fare far better than the assistants deemed complicit in their misdeeds.
Under the penalty, schools that want to hire coaches with active show-cause orders essentially must prove to the NCAA that the rule-breaker has made amends. If not, any broader sanctions levied against the offender's former school can carry over to the new employer.

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