AP source: Manfred 1 vote short in MLB election Print
Written by Admin   
Thursday, 14 August 2014 11:39
MLB Headline News

 BALTIMORE (AP) - Rob Manfred was one vote short of the required three-quarters majority Thursday in balloting to succeed Bud Selig as baseball commissioner, a person familiar with the balloting told The Associated Press.
Manfred, baseball's chief operating officer, received 22 votes and Boston Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner got eight, the person said, speaking on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized.
Team officials met in small groups in midafternoon, resumed and then took a dinner break. Selig took an elevator upstairs.
''I believe we're going to stay until we get it figured out,'' Houston Astros owner Jim Crane told two kids in New York Yankees gear outside the meeting room before posing for a photograph with them. When questioned by reporters, Crane wouldn't discuss the matter further.
The third candidate, MLB Executive Vice President of Business Tim Brosnan, dropped out just before the start of voting.
Teams cast secret written votes in MLB's first contested election for a new commissioner in 46 years. Selig, who has run baseball for 22 years, plans to retire in January.
Each candidate spoke to owners for about an hour Wednesday and met in sessions Thursday morning with groups of 10 teams.
''I wouldn't even guess,'' Los Angeles Angels owner Arte Moreno said Wednesday when asked whether the election would produce a commissioner.
Werner was supported by Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf and Moreno, and the eight-team bloc opposed to Manfred held throughout the afternoon. Other teams have said Reinsdorf wants a commissioner who will take a harsher stance in labor negotiations for the deal to replace the collective bargaining agreement that expires after the 2016 season.
Selig, 80, has ruled baseball since September 1992, first as chairman of baseball's executive council and since July 1998 as commissioner. The second-longest-serving head of baseball behind Kenesaw Mountain Landis (1920-44), Selig announced last fall that he plans to retire in January 2015. The trio of candidates was picked by a seven-man succession committee chaired by St. Louis Cardinals chairman Bill DeWitt Jr.
Manfred, 55, has been involved in baseball since 1987, starting as a lawyer with Morgan, Lewis & Bockius who assisted in collective bargaining. He became MLB's executive vice president for labor relations and human resources in 1998, received an expanded role of executive vice president of economics and league affairs in 2012 and last September was promoted to chief operating officer. He helped lead negotiations for baseball's last three labor contracts with players and the joint drug agreement that was instituted in 2002 and has been repeatedly strengthened.
Werner, 64, was the controlling owner of the San Diego Padres from 1990-94, triggering fan criticism for the payroll-paring departures of Fred McGriff, Gary Sheffield, Tony Fernandez, Randy Myers and Benito Santiago. He has been part of the Red Sox ownership group since 2002, a period that included three World Series titles. While working at ABC, he helped develop Robin Williams' ''Mork & Mindy'' and later was executive producer of ''The Cosby Show'' and ''Roseanne'' at The Carsey-Werner Co.
MLB's last contested election for commissioner was after Spike Eckert was fired in December 1968. With the requirement then a three-quarters majority in both the American and National leagues, teams split between San Francisco Giants vice president Chub Feeney and Yankees president Michael Burke and failed to elect anyone during 19 ballots.
Bowie Kuhn, counsel to baseball's Player Relations Committee, was elected commissioner pro-tem on Feb. 4, 1969, with a one-year term. He was voted a seven-year term that August and remained in office until October 1984, when he was replaced by Los Angeles Olympics head Peter Ueberroth.
Former Yale President A. Bartlett Giamatti took over from Ueberroth in April 1989, died later that September and was replaced by his deputy commissioner, Fay Vincent. Selig, then the Milwaukee Brewers owner, teamed with Reinsdorf to head the group that pressured for Vincent's forced resignation in September 1992.
Selig led baseball as head of the executive council for nearly six years, including the 7 1/2-month strike in 1994-95 that canceled the World Series. He repeatedly said he wouldn't take the job fulltime before he formally was voted commissioner in July 1998.
Ueberroth, Giamatti, Vincent and Selig were elected unanimously.
 

MLB Team Pages

Top MLB Public Bets

View All: NFL |  NBA |  NCAAF |  NCAAB |  MLB |  NHL

MLB Futures

MLB TEAM WORLD SERIES ODDS CURRENT
LOS ANGELES DODGERS 15/2
WASHINGTON NATIONALS 8/1
DETROIT TIGERS 10/1
LOS ANGELES ANGELS 12/1
ST LOUIS CARDINALS 12/1
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS 12/1
CHICAGO CUBS 18/1
KANSAS CITY ROYALS 18/1
SEATTLE MARINERS 18/1
OAKLAND ATHLETICS 20/1
View All

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Contact Us | Advertising | 888-99-SPREAD

THIS IS NOT A GAMBLING SITE – If you think you have a gambling problem click here.

Disclaimer: This site is for informational and entertainment purposes only. Individual users are responsible for the laws regarding accessing gambling information from their jurisdictions. Many countries around the world prohibit gambling, please check the laws in your location. Any use of this information that may violate any federal, state, local or international law is strictly prohibited.

Copyright: The information contained on TheSpread.com website is protected by international copyright and may not be reproduced, or redistributed in any way without expressed written consent.

About: TheSpread.com is the largest sports betting news site in the United States. We provide point spread news, odds, statistics and information to over 199 countries around the world each year. Our coverage includes all North American College and Professional Sports as well as entertainment, political and proposition wagering news.

©1999-2013 TheSpread.com