MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Bud Selig maintains Major League Baseball had no idea Alex Rodriguez received a medical exemption from the sport's drug administrator to use a testosterone-boosting substance in 2007.
Rodriguez received a therapeutic use exemption for the otherwise-banned substance clomid, according to the book ''Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis and the Quest to End Baseball's Steroid Era,'' which was published last week.
Clomid is prescribed for ovulation induction and has been used by men to restore the production of testosterone following a steroids cycle. The book said the exemption was granted by Bryan W. Smith, then the independent administrator of baseball's drug program.
Selig said Tuesday before the All-Star game that MLB didn't know about the decision.
Rodriguez admitted in 2009 that he used a banned performance-enhancing substance while with the Texas Rangers from 2001-03. The New York Yankees third baseman is serving a season-long ban this year after an MLB drug investigation.

Top MLB Public Bets

MLB Top Stories

Thumbnail Kershaw tries to keep visitors' run going The Cubs seized a 3-2 edge in the NLCS by winning Games 4 and 5 in Los Angeles. Will Clayton Kershaw be able to save the Dodgers’...
Thumbnail North Siders' bats rise as NCLS progresses Anthony Rizzo is still batting well below .200 in the playoffs. Yet the Chicago first baseman seems to be heating up at precisely...
Thumbnail Hosts ask Urias to give them 3-1 NLCS edge Tonight, Julio Urias will make history in Game 4 of the NLCS. The Dodgers simply hope that it’s for all the right reasons.
Thumbnail Francona needs relief corps to thrive again The Blue Jays suddenly have life in the NLCS. Now, though, can they truly put fear in the Indians and send the festivities back to northern...
Thumbnail Arrieta tries to lift visitors at Chavez Ravine After getting punched in the mouth in Game 1 of the NLCS, the Dodgers struck back on Sunday night. Can they keep running with the Cubs as the action...
More inMLB Articles  

MLB Team Pages