LOS ANGELES (AP) - A lawsuit that drew attention to violence at sports venues is in the hands of a jury which must decide who is to blame for a beating at Dodger Stadium that left a Giants fan with brain damage.
A lawyer for the severely disabled Bryan Stow said in final arguments that the Los Angeles Dodgers and former owner Frank McCourt were negligent in providing inadequate security for the opening day game in 2011. Tom Girardi asked that Stow be paid $37.5 million for his lifetime care and double that amount for pain and suffering.
A lawyer for the team and McCourt said Stow should get nothing.
Jurors deliberated for three hours after receiving the case Thursday and were to resume Friday.
Girardi contended the team and McCourt failed to provide enough security to keep Stow and other fans safe at the Opening Day game in 2011 between the state rivals.
''Dodger Stadium got to a place where it was a total mess,'' Girardi told jurors. ''There was a culture of violence. Beer sales were off the charts.''
Defense attorney Dana Fox, said the true culprits were Louie Sanchez and Marvin Norwood, Dodger fans who beat Stow and have pleaded guilty. They were not sued, he noted.
''There were three parties responsible - Sanchez, Norwood and, unfortunately, Stow himself. There were things Mr. Stow did that put these things in action,'' Fox said.
He cited testimony that Stow's blood-alcohol level was .18 percent - more than twice the legal limit for driving - and a witness account of Stow yelling in the parking lot with his arms up in the air.
''You don't get yourself this drunk and then say it's not your fault,'' said Fox.
Girardi said the blame lay with the Dodgers organization and McCourt who failed to provide adequate security on a day when they expected emotions to run high among fans.
He also said, ''The only thing Bryan Stow was doing was wearing a jersey that said `Giants.'''
Fox countered that there was more security than at any other Dodgers opening day in history.
Stow made a touching appearance at the trial Wednesday in his wheelchair and jurors were able to see the ghastly scars on his head where his skull was temporarily removed during treatment.
''We would be heartless and inhuman not to feel sympathy for Mr. Stow,'' Fox told jurors. ''These are life-altering injuries.''
However, he reminded jurors they had promised not to let sympathy influence their verdict.
Stow, 45, a former paramedic from Northern California, didn't testify and was not in the courtroom during final arguments.

Recent MLB Discussions

dod 1st 5 thats it on Thu, Oct 2016 by Timmy1961
dod/cubs on Thu, Oct 2016 by Michael Cash
mlb early play on Wed, Oct 2016 by sharkey11

Top MLB Public Bets

MLB Top Stories

Thumbnail Kershaw tries to keep visitors' run going The Cubs seized a 3-2 edge in the NLCS by winning Games 4 and 5 in Los Angeles. Will Clayton Kershaw be able to save the Dodgers’...
Thumbnail North Siders' bats rise as NCLS progresses Anthony Rizzo is still batting well below .200 in the playoffs. Yet the Chicago first baseman seems to be heating up at precisely...
Thumbnail Hosts ask Urias to give them 3-1 NLCS edge Tonight, Julio Urias will make history in Game 4 of the NLCS. The Dodgers simply hope that it’s for all the right reasons.
Thumbnail Francona needs relief corps to thrive again The Blue Jays suddenly have life in the NLCS. Now, though, can they truly put fear in the Indians and send the festivities back to northern...
Thumbnail Arrieta tries to lift visitors at Chavez Ravine After getting punched in the mouth in Game 1 of the NLCS, the Dodgers struck back on Sunday night. Can they keep running with the Cubs as the action...
More inMLB Articles  

MLB Team Pages