BALTIMORE (AP) -When it comes to Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro and other former Orioles linked to baseball's steroids scandal, current Baltimore players are clear: They don't want to talk about the past.
Investigators for former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell's probe are seeking information on ex-Orioles Sosa, Palmeiro, Jason Grimsley, David Segui, Fernando Tatis and Jerry Hairston Jr., according to reports.
The Orioles' clubhouse was uncharacteristically empty before Wednesday night's game against Tampa Bay. Players either planted themselves on couches - which are off-limits to reporters - or donned headphones in front of their lockers.
Manager Sam Perlozzo said he has not been contacted by those associated with the investigation.
``Nobody has asked me any questions about it and I really don't have anything to say,'' Perlozzo said. ``We are going about our business like we always have. We can't worry about somebody else. Somebody else will take care of that.''
Mike Flanagan, the team's executive vice president of baseball operations, declined comment.
At Yankee Stadium, Sosa said ``no comment'' before his Texas Rangers played New York.
Also, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's office in San Francisco declined to comment. That office has been at the center of an ongoing federal steroids investigation.
Sosa, Palmeiro, Grimsley, Segui and Tatis were among those whose medical records were being sought by investigators, The New York Times reported Wednesday.
The (New York) Daily News reported in Wednesday's editions that Mitchell's panel wants information from Hairston, along with Palmeiro, Segui and Tatis.
Sosa and Palmeiro both played for Baltimore in 2005; Grimsley played in 2004-05; Segui retired after an injury-plagued 2004 season with the Orioles; and Tatis was limited action in 2006.
Mitchell initially asked teams for the medical records, but clubs concluded they were not able to release them because of federal and state privacy laws, a lawyer familiar with the requests said, speaking on condition of anonymity because disclosure of such details wasn't authorized.
The union, the commissioner's office and Mitchell's staff agreed in April to a procedure in which Mitchell's staff would ask teams for medical records of certain players, the teams would send the records to the players, and the players would make the decision individually whether to release them to Mitchell's investigators. Mitchell has requested records for more than a dozen players but fewer than 100, the lawyer said.
Mitchell also sent a letter to the players' association on March 28 requesting interviews with active players, and talks on that request are ongoing. Agents for players have said in recent weeks that it was unlikely players would provide medical records of agree to interviews.
AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum contributed to this report.

Top MLB Public Bets


MLB Top Stories

Thumbnail Chicago aims to bounce back vs. Cleveland After hammering the Cubs in last night’s World Series opener, the Indians can’t wait to get back to the field for Game 2. Thankfully for the hosts, their...
Thumbnail World Series opener pits Lester vs. Kluber Two title-starved organizations are ready to kick off one of the most intriguing World Series matchups we’ve seen in some time.
Thumbnail Kershaw tries to keep visitors' run going The Cubs seized a 3-2 edge in the NLCS by winning Games 4 and 5 in Los Angeles. Will Clayton Kershaw be able to save the Dodgers’...
Thumbnail North Siders' bats rise as NCLS progresses Anthony Rizzo is still batting well below .200 in the playoffs. Yet the Chicago first baseman seems to be heating up at precisely...
Thumbnail Hosts ask Urias to give them 3-1 NLCS edge Tonight, Julio Urias will make history in Game 4 of the NLCS. The Dodgers simply hope that it’s for all the right reasons.
More inMLB Articles  

MLB Team Pages