NEW YORK (AP) -Umpires are livid that Major League Baseball has sent investigators to their hometowns, asking neighbors a series of questions that include whether the ump belongs to the Ku Klux Klan.
``The questions that we found out are being asked are about beating wives, marijuana use and extravagant parties,'' World Umpires Association president John Hirschbeck said in a telephone interview Wednesday. ``And then finally with this whole thing about the Ku Klux Klan.
``You get someone from security, shows his credentials and starts asking these kind of questions, and right away what's the neighbor going to think other than the umpire is in trouble, he's done something wrong and he's going to lose his job.''
neighbors of umpire Ron Kulpa, who lives in the St. Louis area.
Baseball stepped up background checks last August, after it became public that the FBI was investigating NBA referee Tim Donaghy for betting on games. Donaghy pleaded guilty to felony charges of conspiracy to engage in wire fraud and transmitting betting information through interstate commerce, and he awaits sentencing.
MLB asked umpires to sign authorizations allowing the sport to conduct financial backgrounds checks, but umps balked.
``We did not anticipate that they would approach neighbors posing as a close colleague and friend of the umpire's and asking them questions such as: Do you know if umpire `X' is a member of the Ku Klux Klan? Does he grow marijuana plants? Does he beat his wife? Have you seen the police at his home? Does he throw wild parties?'' McMorris said by telephone from India.
``To try to link our umpires to the Ku Klux Klan is highly offensive. It is essentially defaming the umpires in their communities by conducting a very strange and poorly executed investigation. It resembles kind of secret police in some kind of despotic nation.''
Contacted Wednesday, Christopher referred questions to Rob Manfred, baseball's executive vice president for labor relations. Manfred did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment.
``The claims of inappropriate questions by individuals conducting background checks was brought to our attention and looked into,'' Jimmie Lee Solomon, MLB's executive vice president of operations, said in a statement. ``It was determined that these claims were inaccurate. Questions was conducted with a written script consistent with common practice, and there was no inappropriate conduct on behalf of the investigators.''
Hirschbeck, who lives in Poland, Ohio, said that shortly before Christmas, he encountered Christopher on a street in his own neighborhood. Hirschbeck said MLB was taking what the WUA considers to be a typical heavy-handed approach to umpires and that it would be brought up in negotiations for the next labor contract. The current deal expires after the 2009 season.
``Once again, baseball's favorite way of doing things: Ready, fire, aim,'' Hirschbeck said. ``It's not a good way to start the season.''

Top MLB Public Bets

MLB Top Stories

Thumbnail Fernandez, Fish welcome Cards to town Between Dee Gordon’s return to the Miami lineup and Ichiro Suzuki’s pursuit of hit No. 3,000, St. Louis righty Michael Wacha promises to have his hands full...
Thumbnail Rockies vs. Mets Predictions With the total sitting at 7 runs, will the Rockies and Mets play under the number when the meet at 1:10PM ET?
Thumbnail Tanaka's Yanks take aim at sweep of Stros On Monday, the Yankees shipped pending free agent Aroldis Chapman to the National League. Yet, don’t be surprised if their rollicking performance of late tables...
Thumbnail Cubs-White Sox standoff moves to Wrigleyville The Cubs and their fans couldn’t wait to get Aroldis Chapman into yesterday’s action. Yet, a no-show on offense prevented the squad’s new closer from even...
Thumbnail Mets, Cardinals lock horns in series finale Last night, Bartolo Colon helped the Mets earn a doubleheader split with the Cardinals as only he could. The majors’ oldest player spotted that 86 mph...
More inMLB Articles  
Advertisement

MLB Team Pages